Monthly Archives: September 2010

Birthday revelation at Cheesecake Factory

My birthday was work the entire day. The WHOLE stinkin thing. But for lunch some of my friends from All Girls Allowed took me to the Cheesecake Factory and made my day brighter!

As I talked to their team, Chai Ling pointed something out to me that didn’t hit me then, but really punched me in the heart later on:

“You know, if you were in China, you wouldn’t be allowed to live”.

I nodded and had a somber moment and we continued our discussion and consumption of cheesecake.

I realized much later in the day that I am the second child — and a girl. If I was born in China in 1985, I WOULDN’T be alive. Neither would my brothers. My favorite people on earth would be gone–and not necessarily because they were never allowed to be born and never began to grow—more because (especially in my case), I would have been either aborted or brought to term, delivered, then killed or abandoned. If my parents used an illegal ultrasound, they would have most likely aborted me and if they didn’t, then I would’ve likely been killed with a needle in my brain directly upon being born.

My brother would’ve been forcefully aborted no matter what my parents decided, unless they could pay 5 years salary for him. The government would have come in and grabbed my mom and dragged her screaming to a clinic and aborted Noah even though she loved him already.

Do we realize what we have? Or that our siblings are blessings? I don’t care how much you fight with your siblings–you HAVE THEM—and should thank God today that they’re alive.

My 25th birthday meant a lot more after realizing the gift of life i was given by being born in the USA to loving parents.

Also, I’m not suggesting that all Chinese people kill their babies. For more details, visit: http://www.allgirlsallowed.org/About/FrequentlyAskedQuestions.aspx .

as for the rest of my birthday, it involved playing worship at park street, being given lots of food (people give you more food as gifts the older you get! not complaining!) and sitting outside for hours with Billy and Julie, two new homeless friends. It was so epic. We prayed together and we were all thankful for each other–everybody else had left and I needed people to eat junk with and pray with anyways! It was a great birthday party on the steps of Park Street. Walked 4 miles home in the night talking to Brandon. It was lovely. I’m just really glad I was allowed to live and not be killed or taken by the government.

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I never thought I’d see the day

Today on my walking commute from Mission Hill to the Pru, i listened to an old old man named Charles preach to Bible college students.

He said:
“I never thought I’d see abortion. LEGALIZED! ABORTION LEGALIZED. the KILLING of the innocent.”

then
“I never thought I’d see our government encouraging people to gamble and lose all their money.”

and

“I NEVER THOUGHT ID SEE homosexual marriage.”

Now, I am not NOT NOT making a statement about abortion or gay marriage or gambling. I am saying that this man was getting so worked up—was obviously so disturbed…it was almost as if he was realizing

    as he was saying it

that it was 2010 and our country had surprised him greatly.

He said “we’re in a downward spiral..” and encouraged the students to love God and proclaim truth.

OK, so here is what i AM saying:

Many baby-boomers and older people are VERY SHOCKED at our current situation in America. They cannot believe the pants teenagers wear, prayer in school being changed / banned, or abortion being legalized. But you know what? OUR generation is the opposite! We do not say “I never thought I’d see the day when..” We’re more like “I bet you that in 20 years…”

We expect evil, in a way. Nothing surprises us anymore. Gang or porn addiction statistics, figures about poverty…we’re not shocked and “never thought we’d see the day”.

Also, the YOUNGER generation (who are 10 now)—it’s even scarier. Because they’ll grow up with parents who never say “When i was your age, sex before marriage was considered a bad thing to do”. They’ll grow up with parents who had sex before marriage. They’ll expect evil too but not realize it (like we 20 somethings do).

this is all kinda doom and gloom, and i’m sorry. It just hit me on the way in that i ALWAYS thought i’d see homicide rates go up and poverty rates soar–porn addiction increase and gay marriages performed. Just saying.

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To my Muslim Friends

To my friends who are Muslim–first of all—I love you guys/girls. I do. Even those of you I do not know as well, your kindness and warmth has always meant more to me than I’ve communicated.

The most ironic thing about writing this is that all of you already know that you can’t judge all Christians by the act of one very very non-representative person, even though Christians sometimes judge all Muslims by one or two non-representative persons. I know this isn’t needed because you are reasonable and loving people, but I thought it wise anyways to address Christians too.

I want to look at the topic of Koran burning and offer what Jesus would actually say about it. I hope to show through a few other New Testament Scriptures that followers of Christ’s teachings do NOT do things like this to our neighbors.

In Luke 10, Jesus is asked by an expert in the law about how to inherit eternal life: So Jesus turns the question back to him and asks what the law teaches:

27He answered: ” ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind'[a]; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.'[b]”

28″You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do this and you will live.”

29But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

    30In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he fell into the hands of robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, took him to an inn and took care of him. 35The next day he took out two silver coins[c] and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

    36″Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

    37The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”
    Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

    Everything I read in the Bible points to love. Love of God, love of my neighbor. It’s clear in this passage that I am to love people different from myself. And what is love?

    Corinthians 13: 4Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

    8Love never fails.

    What we have here–in this event planned to happen Saturday, September 11th, is love failing. And that’s an oxymoron. I am sorry that our American church has moved far away from the command to love our neighbors as ourselves, honor one another above ourselves and with gentleness and respect.

    1 Peter says in chapter 3:

    15 but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect, 16 having a good conscience, so that, when you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ may be put to shame. 17 For it is better to suffer for doing good, if that should be God’s will, than for doing evil.

    How clear is this statement to the early church? If you’re still reading, I know that these references were not necessary. You are not ignorant and respect Jesus and His ‘people of the book’ already. You already know that we do NOT believe it is ok to burn holy books of other faiths. You know that most of your Christian friends are disgusted with this action.

    But still, I wanted to write and say that I appreciate you for the times when you showed me more about Islam, more about Arabic (some of you!) and never made me feel stupid or out of place because of questions. Many of us were friends DURING this mess in Iraq, had class together while the USA bombed Baghdad, and never judged me or quit being my friend because I was a white evangelical Christian.

    I’ve come to the realization that Jesus HImself brings peace in my life, and that He unifies groups that otherwise never could be unified. I will say that just as in Acts 15 (check it out!) the believers decided that no one needed to become Jewish to be Christian..in the same way, today–you do not need to become Christian to love or follow Jesus. If his words stand out as the words of God and he begins to invade thoughts or dreams, do not think that in order to believe in Him, you need to become Christian.

    To the Christians who’ve surrendered all to Christ and gave God your sin to remove, your skills to use and the rest of your days to direct——-please know that when he took those things he always gave you instructions to love your neighbor in kindness, respect and gentleness. And he gave you the power to love no matter how it’s received (or not).

    Maybe we should learn respect from the Muslims here in Boston who’ve shared Iftar with me during Ramadan. Or from my ‘mwalim-ee’ who, though a Harvard professor and a famous secretary of education from Iraq, teaches me Arabic for free because he has generosity and care for others.

    Jesus Himself loved people different from Him and still loves Muslims today very much. I am sorry for the actions being taken by the American church, and I hope these Scriptures helped to show that we serve a God of love, peace and forgiveness.

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To my Muslim friends

To my friends who are Muslim–first of all—I love you guys/girls. I do. Even those of you I do not know as well, your kindness and warmth has always meant more to me than I’ve communicated.

The most ironic thing about writing this is that all of you already know that you can’t judge all Christians by the act of one very very non-representative person, even though Christians sometimes judge all Muslims by one or two non-representative persons. I know this isn’t needed because you are reasonable and loving people, but I thought it wise anyways to address Christians too.

I want to look at the topic of Koran burning and offer what Jesus would actually say about it. I hope to show through a few other New Testament Scriptures that followers of Christ’s teachings do NOT do things like this to our neighbors.

In Luke 10, Jesus is asked by an expert in the law about how to inherit eternal life: So Jesus turns the question back to him and asks what the law teaches:

27He answered: ” ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind'[a]; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.'[b]”

28″You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do this and you will live.”

29But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

    30In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he fell into the hands of robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, took him to an inn and took care of him. 35The next day he took out two silver coins[c] and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

    36″Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

    37The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”
    Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

    Everything I read in the Bible points to love. Love of God, love of my neighbor. It’s clear in this passage that I am to love people different from myself. And what is love?

    Corinthians 13: 4Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. 5It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. 6Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. 7It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.

    8Love never fails.

    What we have here–in this event planned to happen Saturday, September 11th, is love failing. And that’s an oxymoron. I am sorry that our American church has moved far away from the command to love our neighbors as ourselves, honor one another above ourselves and with gentleness and respect.

    1 Peter says in chapter 3:

    15 but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect, 16 having a good conscience, so that, when you are slandered, those who revile your good behavior in Christ may be put to shame. 17 For it is better to suffer for doing good, if that should be God’s will, than for doing evil.

    How clear is this statement to the early church? If you’re still reading, I know that these references were not necessary. You are not ignorant and respect Jesus and His ‘people of the book’ already. You already know that we do NOT believe it is ok to burn holy books of other faiths. You know that most of your Christian friends are disgusted with this action.

    But still, I wanted to write and say that I appreciate you for the times when you showed me more about Islam, more about Arabic (some of you!) and never made me feel stupid or out of place because of questions. Many of us were friends DURING this mess in Iraq, had class together while the USA bombed Baghdad, and never judged me or quit being my friend because I was a white evangelical Christian.

    I’ve come to the realization that Jesus HImself brings peace in my life, and that He unifies groups that otherwise never could be unified. I will say that just as in Acts 15 (check it out!) the believers decided that no one needed to become Jewish to be Christian..in the same way, today–you do not need to become Christian to love or follow Jesus. If his words stand out as the words of God and he begins to invade thoughts or dreams, do not think that in order to believe in Him, you need to become Christian.

    To the Christians who’ve surrendered all to Christ and gave God your sin to remove, your skills to use and the rest of your days to direct——-please know that when he took those things he always gave you instructions to love your neighbor in kindness, respect and gentleness. And he gave you the power to love no matter how it’s received (or not).

    Maybe we should learn respect from the Muslims here in Boston who’ve shared Iftar with me during Ramadan. Or from my ‘mwalim-ee’ who, though a Harvard professor and a famous secretary of education from Iraq, teaches me Arabic for free because he has generosity and care for others.

    Jesus Himself loved people different from Him and still loves Muslims today very much. I am sorry for the actions being taken by the American church, and I hope these Scriptures helped to show that we serve a God of love, peace and forgiveness.

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